The entire annual supply of electricity or gas for a specific meter will be actual supply if,  during the applicable compliance year (April to March), there are at least two actual meter readings at least half a year apart (for example, 183 days apart). Where a supply was only the responsibility of the participant for part of the year the principle can be applied proportionally. For example, for meter X owned between 1 April and 30 June (91 days), there must be two meter readings at least 46 days apart for the supply to be classified as ‘actual’. 

 

The entire annual supply of electricity or gas for a specific meter is defined as an estimated  supply if, during the applicable compliance year (April to March), the amount of the supply is estimated by the supplier for at least half the year (that is, there are not two actual meter readings at least half a year apart). If the annual supply is classified as an estimated supply, this supply figure must be entered in the ‘Estimated Supply’ column in the annual report. 

 

The CRC Registry will automatically add 10% uplift to the emissions associated with that supply to account for the supply figure  potentially being inaccurate. It is therefore in your organisation’s interest to ensure meter readings are taken so that you won’t have to classify any of your supplies as estimates.

 

CRC definitions of estimated supply will be different from your suppliers’ definitions of estimated supply. It is therefore important that you review your supply records in accordance with the rules given above to find out whether the supply counts as an estimate under the CRC scheme .For example, a supply which your energy supplier says is an estimate may not have to be classified as an ‘estimate’ under CRC. Therefore when inputting readings into the system, users must input the correct dates for the actual/estimate quantities so the system can calculate using the 183 day rule if it is an actual or estimate supply.